Pet First Aid Part II

Posted by Pia

I'm glad to hear you DW'ers found last week's Pet First Aid Part I to be so valuable! As promised, instructor Denise Fleck is back this week offering more life-saving tips for what to do if your pet is choking. According to Denise, "The Best 911 for Your Choking Dog is YOU!"

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There is just no substitute for getting hands-on training in a pet CPR class, like those taught by Denise Fleck.

1 There is just no substitute for getting hands-on training in a pet CPR class, like those taught by Denise Fleck.

The following tips are only guidelines and must be done very carefully to avoid causing further harm. Please consider taking a pet CPR course.

2 The following tips are only guidelines and must be done very carefully to avoid causing further harm. Please consider taking a pet CPR course.

For choking incidents, use your fingers to remove any visible obstruction, but look closely -- do not blindly sweep his mouth. You could push the object farther back or tear laryngeal tissue if the object is lodged.

3 For choking incidents, use your fingers to remove any visible obstruction, but look closely -- do not blindly sweep his mouth. You could push the object farther back or tear laryngeal tissue if the object is lodged.

If that doesn’t work, a modified version of the Heimlich maneuver, which you can learn in a pet first-aid class, may be necessary.

4 If that doesn’t work, a modified version of the Heimlich maneuver, which you can learn in a pet first-aid class, may be necessary.

Close your hand to make a fist, similar to the Heimlich technique commonly performed on humans.

5 Close your hand to make a fist, similar to the Heimlich technique commonly performed on humans.

Stand or kneel behind the animal and place your arms around his waist, keeping his head down.

6 Stand or kneel behind the animal and place your arms around his waist, keeping his head down.

Place your fist in the soft part of the stomach just behind the last rib.

7 Place your fist in the soft part of the stomach just behind the last rib.

Grasp the fist with your other hand similar to the Heimlich technique.

8 Grasp the fist with your other hand similar to the Heimlich technique.

For smaller pets, instead of a fist, use just a couple fingers in the soft part of the stomach just behind the last rib.

9 For smaller pets, instead of a fist, use just a couple fingers in the soft part of the stomach just behind the last rib.

Grasp the fist with your other hand and compress the abdomen by pushing up in a quick and rapid manner similar to the Heimlich technique.

10 Grasp the fist with your other hand and compress the abdomen by pushing up in a quick and rapid manner similar to the Heimlich technique.

If your pet becomes unconscious, lay him on his side and compress lungs by squeezing with the heel of your hand on the side of his chest to dislodge object.

11 If your pet becomes unconscious, lay him on his side and compress lungs by squeezing with the heel of your hand on the side of his chest to dislodge object.

For a smaller pet who loses consciousness, lay him on his side and compress lungs by squeezing with a few fingers on the side of his chest to dislodge the object.

12 For a smaller pet who loses consciousness, lay him on his side and compress lungs by squeezing with a few fingers on the side of his chest to dislodge the object.

Learning these life-saving techniques will help keep your pet safe and healthy like this happy guy.

13 Learning these life-saving techniques will help keep your pet safe and healthy like this happy guy.

One Lucky Dog's Tale, by Denise Fleck

Nikki sat down in front of the TV for an evening snack and a scary movie with her miniature schnauzers at her feet waiting for a morsel -- their eyes wide open, ears pricked high with their hot doggie breath hitting her legs. She tossed them each a kernel of popcorn, and the food-hound of the duo gulped it at the speed of lightning. Suddenly he opened his mouth, gagged and then stopped coughing altogether before going silent. Not only was the food lodged in his tiny windpipe, Nikki's furry child had stopped breathing!

Dogs love putting things in their mouths, and anything on the floor is fair game. So I insist that people "get down on all fours" and look at their homes and yards from their pet's perspective. But since choking can occur from food or toys, so it's important to learn how to perform the doggie Heimlich-like maneuver and chest thrusts just in case your four-legged friend gets into trouble. A large number of my students have successfully used these techniques and saved the day for their dogs!

Fortunately for the schnauzer, his owner knew how to perform the canine Heimlich, and the popcorn kernel flew out of his doggie mouth. (In fact, the pooch quickly retrieved it before his owner could, and this time swallowed without a problem.

Whew... that was a close one! And just from a little popcorn kernel!

Needless to say, there is no substitute for getting hands-on training! To enroll in one of Denise's upcoming classes or if you are in search of a class, contact Denise for information or to set one up!

Thanks again to Denise and all those guardians who have already gotten the training needed to help our furry friends.

Check back with me next Thursday for more great first aid information.

In kinship,
Dr. Pia Salk

Comments (7)

  • pet first aid love it...........

  • Thanks again Dr. Pia and Denise. I posted this to Twitter and Facebook.

  • Hello ladies, Kirby here.
    And hello to you too Dr. Pia. I missed last weeks post so I’ll have to go back and look it up. First Aid is something everyone should know something about. Who knows when you may have to save a life. My Daddy says that most first aid used on humans can be used on animals too. I’m really glad that you are showing just how to use some methods on smaller animals but they will work on larger ones too. I don’t know how you would get your arms around a horse, but I’ll bet most horse lovers will find a way to help a choking horse. Did I tell you I love horses? I think I did at one, maybe more, time.
    Catch you later, Kirby.

  • What wonderful advice Dr.Pia...
    I can relate to this story, but I was not so fortunate...Giving one of my Arabian horses his pellets he occasionally would choke, and I would hit his underbelly and he'd coughed it up, but ironically years later the same thing happened, this time I could not get it dislodged, not even the Vet could, until we took him to the Vet hospital, but then he ended being put down for a related incident because of his choking causing...I blame myself and have guilt to this day...I had my dear Ibn since a small foal, he lived with me for 29 years...and I miss him terribly.

  • Hi Dr. Pia and Denise, Thank you so much for another important blog post about Pet First Aid help that all animal lovers need to know to protect their special babies! I have done similar things to save several of my wonderful dogs. Look forward to next week's part 3 information. Have a great day everyone! Jan

  • PETA has released the horrifying findings of an undercover investigation performed at Angel’s Gate in Delhi, New York, a non-profit hospice and rehabilitation center for special needs animals.

    The shelter, run by Susan Marino, claims that its mission is to care for “animals many of whom are terminally and / or critically ill or physically challenged, come to live out their days in peace, dignity and love.” The PETA investigator found the opposite to be true.

    At Angel’s Gate, the investigator was able to obtain photos and video revealing unspeakable conditions. Described as a “chaotic hellhole,” the animals, who required special attention and 24 hour care, were denied veterinary care and “deprived of basic necessities and quality of life.”

    PETA’s findings include:

    •Paralyzed animals were forced to drag themselves around, developing bleeding ulcers in the process.
    •Animals kept in dirty diapers for up to two days.
    •Feedings included rancid raw meat which had been left unrefrigerated.
    •Animals in desperate need of veterinary care were denied. “One dog's infected, rotten jaw snapped in half.”
    •No proper shelter for animals who were kept outside in freezing temperatures.
    •Animals denied basic necessities such as water.
    •Bodies of dead animals left among the living
    In one entry, the PETA investigator writes:

    Tuxie had blood and tissue spattered on the walls and floor like I find every day. Tuxie had an ocular discharge and nasal discharge, as I reported on prior occasions. … Susan said that the wound is not infected, yet the appearance, odor, and Tuxie’s demeanor, in my extensive experience with animals and providing professional veterinary care to them, tell me otherwise. Tuxie is very ill and he needs extensive care; picking his scabs and watching him deteriorate in the cage for two years is not helping him. … So many of the dogs need veterinary care beyond the care necessary for their main condition or handicap. Jeanie’s mouth is full of infection, which is obviously due to the purulent discharge running down the left side of her mouth. The stench coming from her mouth is nauseating.

    Upon competition of the investigation, PETA turned over its findings to the Delaware County District Attorney's Office. To push things along, PETA would like supporters—and anyone who is appalled by this story—to urge District Attorney Richard Northrup Jr., who is currently reviewing the evidence, to file cruelty-to-animals charges against Susan Marino. Send an email to Richard Northrup, Jr. from PETA’s action alert page.

  • Thanks for the invaluable tips!

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